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One of the things I love about making art, is its ability to freeze time, to keep us conscious of a moment that would normally pass, so that it can never be forgotten.

I painted “Buzzard” (above) in India ink when I was 16 years old. It was one of my first full scale aqueous media paintings. In this piece I see the careful attention to detail, the painstaking rendering of each feather, each shadow, and the love and joy I put into this work as if it were to be the last record of my soul on this Earth — that’s the way I always paint. Looking at this painting makes me happy, in a way that a simple photo never could.

Painting: “Buzzard” by Adesina:

Buzzard india ink painting by artist Adesina

India Ink on archival watercolor paper, painted at age 16, 11″ x 14″

Click to purchase»

Incidentally, I took the photo itself, of me with the painting, only a few weeks ago. I had elected to finally put the painting up for sale, after decades of not wanting to part with it. In a rush of nostalgia, remembering what it was like to be 16, and exploring a talent I held dearer to myself than even the life that enabled it, I decided — why not take one last photo with my painting, wearing my Sweet 16 dress?? And so I searched my boxes for it, and there it was, the black velvet floor length dress I wore at my Sweet 16. And yes, yes it still fits!

So I sat on the ground, wearing this old dress full of memories, holding one of my favorite paintings that I’ve ever done, and I took this photo that you see here. And then I brought it into Photoshop, adjusted lights and darks, dodged and burned, cropped the image for composition, and basically made another mini work of art, out of the photo of myself with the art lol. You didn’t think I would just leave the photo as it was, flat and boring just out of the camera, did you? Hehe never! I’m an artist; I must put my artist’s touch on every image I create.

I still feel apprehensive about letting this piece go. It’s part of my history & my heritage; it’s representative of my journey & my joy as an artist. But I recognize that the purpose of art, is not only to freeze time, as this painting has done for me, for so many years, but it is also about sharing one’s journey with others. And I know my love of nature, captured in this hand-painted rendering of a creature not often regarded as regal, but who is clearly so, nonetheless, is something that many people share with me. Additionally, I know that there are others who also desire the experience of gazing upon a work of art, where every line, shade and shadow is painstakingly hand-crafted.

This painting is not just a record of a buzzard against a black background. It’s a record of the love a 16 year old budding artist had, for nature and all of Her creatures. It’s a pause in the passage of time, and a journey I’d now like to share, with the world.

Thank you for spending a moment with me here, and if you are interested in having this piece in your home, please follow this link, or contact me if you would like a print; I will not be making unlimited prints of this piece, however I may make small postcard prints of it upon request.

xoxo,

Adesina

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Photo of ceramic heart sculpture by Artist Adesina Sanchez

Hey there! I’ve been busy in the studio and thought I’d share a work in progress that just came out of the kiln! And yes lol, it’s meant to be in two halves — it opens!

Here’s a video of it that I posted on Instagram:

 

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A post shared by Adesina™, Artist (NYC) (@artbyadesina) on

Right now I’m calling it “Heartfelt Values” but that could change as it evolves. I actually started out with a very different concept – a heart yes, but for very different reasons than its current purpose. Now I’m going to add some additional pieces to give it context – I bet you can’t guess what I’m adding?

I’m also excited about the stand I’m making for it, out of a completely different material. Stay tuned for updates, and for my full artist’s statement on the piece. It’s going to fit nicely with the rest of the series when it’s done.

Love,

Adesina
xoxo

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Photo of artist Adesina Sanchez and her ceramic Wakanda mini mask

So pleased to share this mini head which I made as part of a larger series. As you can guess from this blog post title, I’ve taken some inspiration from Black Panther – the underglaze mimics Shuri’s face paint!

Check out a short video of this piece, below:

 

Making art is such a soothing and self-affirming process. Sculpting this piece in particular reminded me of my first sculptures as a child, because back then I was very much preoccupied with finish, and on this piece, I tested several underglaze combinations before I was satisfied.

There’s more to come with this piece and others, so bookmark its portfolio page for updates!

xo,
Adesina (She Opens the Way)

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photo of a drawing by Adesina, artist, of a girl and her cat

If you’re someone who has already had work commissioned for you in the past, you’re probably already aware of the process. But for those of you who haven’t, I’m going to elaborate on the process of having an original work of art commissioned for yourself. This is particularly for those who have been wanting to do so for a while and are finally ready to take the first step!
Photo of A Smiling Man and Woman At An Art Gallery

Everything You Should Know:

If you are looking to commission a work of art for the first time and are not sure where to start, here’s how you go about it.

The Artist

The first thing you want to do is choose an artist who you wish to commission. Keep in mind that every artist has their own style and capabilities. To get a good sense of the artist’s style, visit their web site and check out their previous work, like artist Adesina, or any other artist you have in mind.

However, sometimes what’s in an artist’s portfolio, isn’t all they can do. Many artists, especially those just starting out, or who don’t make art full-time, just haven’t yet had the opportunity or time to create work in all the styles that they are capable of. And your commission might just be the chance they were waiting for! So feel free to contact the artist, if you see that they have work that you like, even if it isn’t exactly what you are looking for. This is particularly a good idea, if their existing work is more complex or requires more skill than perhaps you require.

A good example of the above, is a realistic artist who has mostly highly detailed, realistic paintings in their portfolio. If they don’t have a lot of pieces, and/or it looks like they are just starting out, it’s possible that they would like to explore other, simpler/looser styles of painting, but just haven’t done so yet. Or perhaps they already have created works like that, but simply haven’t posted them up on their site yet.

Another good example, is if perhaps you are looking for a sculpture of your pet, and you find a sculptor online who has done a few really great sculptural busts of people. More than likely, if they can realistically sculpt a human being (hair included of course!), they can probably make something beautiful of your furry pet as well.

photo of a drawing by Adesina, artist, of a girl and her cat Drawing of a woman and her cat, by Artist Adesina

In cases like these, get in touch, send them an email, and just ask: Would they like to do something in the style of, or in regards to the subject matter, that you are looking for? Do they have any relevant samples that are not on their site yet, that they can share via email? In many cases, the artist will be happy for your interest and inquiry, and even if they can’t create what you need, often artists can recommend colleagues who can. Take advantage of their network and recommendations; you might find the perfect person, without having to do endless searching!

Once you find an artist whose work and style you appreciate or connect with, then you can move to the next step.

How they Work

It helps to connect with the artist you wish to commission, and find out if they do commissions to begin with. Further, different artists have different work parameters or boundaries. There may be some that appreciate a little direction, and others who would rather you left the art to them.

Figure out what you prefer, and find out if the artist and you are on the same plane.

In my studio, for example, I always ask that the client provide images of the style, indicating the level of detail, as well as the level of realism or lack thereof, that they are looking for. Clients can pick from my online gallery at Adesina.com, or they can just Google general images, and send me the ones they like.
Man And Woman Looking At A Painting

Something to Work With

You will need to give the artist you commission some information, even if they are the independent sort. Things you might want to consider include what you’re looking for by way of size, preferred shades or colors, as well as themes to work on (if that is an option).

Giving the artist a sense of what you’re looking for will help them proceed to create the work you want to see.

Monetary Particulars

Once you and the artist are on the same page about the work you’re commissioning, the artist will quote a figure. Typically, you will probably need to pay them part of the figure as an advance for materials and initial payment, to begin your commissioned piece.

Sessions and Coordination

If you’re having someone do a live portrait of you instead of from photos, you’ll need to coordinate and schedule sessions and sittings where you model for the artist. Make sure you pick an artist who isn’t too far away! Unless of course you want to make a trip of it — perhaps a vacation/portrait-painting-trip to New York City?

Final Payments and Receiving the Work

When the artist finishes working on the piece you have commissioned, you will be asked to make one last payment. This will probably be the balance remaining from the quote provided when you began the process. Once this payment is made, voila! You have your first commissioned piece of work!

Conclusion

As you can see, commissioning a piece of work is fairly easy if you have the resources. It’s finding the right artist that’s key to a great outcome. But by taking the first step and just reaching out to an artist that you like, they may be able to help guide you to refine your project idea, and to find the right artist for you, even if they can’t help you out themselves, saving you lots of time and energy!

If you want to commission and own your first personal piece of art, feel free to circle back to my webpage Adesina™ | Artist. I’m in the midst of preparing for a solo show, but I’m still accepting select small commissions (black and white drawings and small sculpted heads) thru the end of 2018, after which all commissions will be available again! You might even find something you like in my collection of affordable art prints, ceramics and sculpture. Alternatively, get in touch and let’s talk about what you’re looking for – I love to help!

– Adesina, Artist

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While I mull over the final finish for my latest sculpture, Objectification (I), I thought I’d put together a video of the process, to give a little glimpse into the weeks of hard work that even a small sculpture can take.

From molding the clay on the armature, to covering it in several coats of plaster to make a cast, to letting that dry only to dig out the original clay, and fill it with more plaster, to finally chipping away at the mould to reveal the final sculpture underneath, it is quite a journey!

I hope you enjoy the video and the process, and I can’t wait to share the final reveal when her patina is done.

(Read more about the meaning of this sculpture, here»)

Love,

Adesina

Photo of Adesina with her sculpture

Adesina poses in the studio with her sculpture Objectification I

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Close up image of Objectification I - a sculpture by artist Adesina

Hello my loves,

As Women’s History Month comes to a close, I wanted to share one of my recent sculptures, focused on the female form, which is currently drying in my studio & awaiting a coat of varnish and a patina: “Objectification (I).”

If you have a moment, here is her story:

In the aftermath of the #MeToo movement earlier this year, I’ve been thinking a lot about what it means to be a woman, in a culture where sexual predation still occurs, yet somehow has been ignored in certain sectors, for so very long. Especially since I have been working in the entertainment industry as a television host for the past 13 years, and even having been introduced to the “casting couch” myself (to which I said “No thank you, I’ll pass” lol), the entire movement hit very close to home.

Image of the legs, feet and face of Objectification I - a plaster sculpture by Adesina

Objectification I sculpture by artist Adesina – legs, feet and face only.

This sculpture, a nude woman, her face neatly removed as if through a futuristic, bloodless surgery, and placed by her feet, is not so much about sexual assault in and of itself, as much as it’s about the erasure of women’s identities, in the midst of all these accusations and public outcry. It’s about how it feels to be exposed to the world, with one’s story of sexual abuse or harassment, and being made into just one of a huge number of interchangeable women – angry women, mistreated women, scared women, women who were in the wrong place at the wrong time, or women labeled as just plain stupid, or manipulative even, for having been in these situations in the first place, and for either disclosing, or not disclosing, after the fact (and in many cases – you are wrong no matter which you choose).

It’s the objectification not of the body, but of the mind & of the soul, which leaves one naked and alone, even as we stand strong, and our voices rise together; so that we remain faceless, in the aftermath of a movement that we put so much hope into, and of which we have yet to see what the far-reaching outcomes will be.

Once the sculpture is completely dried and a patina applied, I will post more about her, with some video of the process, which if you have ever casted a clay sculpture in plaster, you know is quite an ordeal hehe!

Thank you so much for reading, and if you’d like to place a bid on this piece before it’s done (thus securing her for yourself in advance) please contact me here.

Full image of Objectification I - a plaster sculpture by Adesina

Complete sculpture – Objectification I – by Adesina.

Much love,

Adesina xo

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New Sight Blooms by Artist Adesina in progress shot
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Artist Adesina’s Rebirth Wine Bottle Series in a photo by Rod Savant

Happy Tuesday! I hope everyone is having a great day so far — I definitely am! I recently got to visit the house of one of my collectors, and LOOK — two of my “Rebirth” wine bottles from back in 2011!

 

It felt so good to see them displayed in a loving home setting, and to pick them up and remember all the time it took to paint them (30 hours just to paint the one with the eye – “New Sight Blooms”), not to mention how proud I felt to do all that work knowing 100% of the proceeds would benefit charity.

When I was first approached by Rawhouse Wine to paint these bottles, I was really excited, but honestly I was also overwhelmed, because I have a very detailed painting style, and I knew that painting six bottles, to the high standards I hold myself to, would be over 100 hours of work, and for free, since they were auctioned off for a children’s art & music charity.

But then I thought about when I was a child, and how badly I wanted to be an artist, but the NYC public school system was always cutting arts education, making it nearly impossible for me to get access to the training I needed. And I realized that I have to the power to help other little kids just like who I was all those years ago. So, I buckled down, joined team #nosleep lol, and I did it! And if I remember correctly, it was down to the wire and I was delivering the finished bottles something like the day before the auction, and up to the last minute, I still didn’t know if I’d be able to finish.

After the auction, I took two of the beautiful professional photos that Rod Savant took of the bottles, and sold them at an art show to benefit Artistic Dreams International, another children’s charity that I actually used to volunteer for, teaching drawing to underprivileged kids up in Harlem.

So you can imagine all the emotions I felt when I saw these two pieces again, still holding a place of honor in a home, so many years later. This is the legacy I wish to leave behind: Beautiful art & loving philanthropy, always.

What is the legacy you wish to leave behind? Perhaps there is something we can collaborate on, to help the community, and bring more beauty into the world? Feel free to leave a comment below, or message me here. I’d love to hear from you!

Love,

Adesina

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The Lifestyle Republic screenshot

Happy President’s Day! I hope everyone is enjoying the day off and reflecting on our nation’s history and how we can constantly improve, moving forward. In the words of President Kennedy, “Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.”

I asked myself that question last month, and decided that the condition of our civil rights is one of the more urgent issues at hand in politics today. One of the many reasons I decided to start my “I Have A Dream” charity campaign for Black History Month.

And now, I’m so honored to share with you, that The Lifestyle Republic has picked up my story, and featured me this month in a video interview that delves into my past as an artist, and gets right into the thick of the current charity campaign.

Please check it out if you have a moment 🙂 :

TheLifestyleRepublic.com/content/5544

Thank you so much for spending some time with me today, and if you would like to participate in the “I Have A Dream” project, and donate to the ACLU to help preserve our civil rights (100% of the profits go to the ACLU), please get an art card of your very own, for just $5, here on eBay.

Thanks again and have a great week!

<3 Adesina

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Happy Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Day!

Every year on this day we reflect back on the life and the legacy of Dr. King: his mission to create equality and ease the suffering of those who are unfairly treated, because of their skin color, their gender, or their creed. Today more than ever his message is needed, and even though he is no longer with us, there are organizations that are fulfilling his Dream, one day at a time.

That’s why this year, in honor of Dr. King’s birthday, and to celebrate the 5-year anniversary of the tribute I created in his honor: IHaveADream2013.com, I am donating 100% of the profits from all new sales of my I Have A Dream 2013 postcards, to civil rights non-profit, the American Civil Liberties Union, for the next 30 days.

For almost 100 years, the ACLU has worked to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States. They have been battling in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the Constitution’s promise of equal liberty for everyone in our country: from fighting for free speech, to immigrant’s rights, to fighting against discrimination — in short, they uphold many of the same ideals as Dr. King did, in his lifetime.

If you would like to contribute to their cause, and have a postcard of your own, please find out more here».

In addition, here are two other charities which I urge you to check out; they are contributing to the cause of the Dreamers, and they can use all the help they can get:


Unitedwedream.org/

lc4daca.org/

Thank you so much for reading, and have a blessed day!

xo,

Adesina

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Dream Tee Shirt by Artist Adesina

My art is a tee! I’m so thrilled about how well this turned out — I’m going to wear this every day for the rest of the summer! If you’d like one for yourself, they’re on sale here».

Quote: “There is nothing like a Dream to create the Future.” – Victor Hugo

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