fbpx

All posts tagged art

Photo of mixed media drawing by Adesina Sanchez

It doesn’t matter if you’re a creative professional who likes working on your own schedule, or a nine to fiver managing highly confidential client accounts; burnouts are a thing! When it comes to artists and creative folk in particular, burnout is sometimes related to a lack of inspiration.

Personally I’ve felt burned out on numerous occasions in my career and have found that there are things we can do to re-inspire ourselves and get those creative juices flowing again. I’m going to share some of those with you here over the course of this blog. Bonus: This is really two blog posts in one, because at the end, I’ll share one final way to stay creative (making prints), that will add a new facet to your art business in the process!

Re-Inspiring Yourself

Inspiration for an artist is where all the beautiful and captivating work springs from. Without it, creating becomes a lot harder, if near impossible. How does one overcome the feeling of burnout and proceed to re-inspire? Here are some tips that can help.

Keep Your Gear Close

At times, amidst a burnout, you might have a fleeting idea when you least expect it. At these times you would probably wish you had your art supplies or tools close by. Well, why can’t you? Keep your basic supplies close at hand. Even when on the go, carry a sketchbook or moleskin. This way, you can catch that fleeting inspiration when it comes and build on it later!

Live a Little

As many artists would know, there are times when a process has you studio-bound for days, if not weeks on end. This is all well and good, however if the walls of your studio start closing in and your feel inspirationally dry ? Get out! Immerse yourself in some spontaneous activity. Hit the city center, go get yourself some ice cream, talk to a stranger. Basically, live a little. Life is full of inspiration and there is no telling where it might come from!

Photos of an artist sitting barefoot with brushes Artist sitting on the floor with their brushes

Make a Mess

At times as artists, we get a little caught up in our technique and pursuing perfection. The trouble with this, is that at times we can become self critical to the point of stagnation. If this is the case with you, and you find yourself shooting down your own work before you even begin, lighten up. Take out your paints or whatever medium you use, and make a mess —  on purpose! Have at it. Get the clutter out, and the good ideas will surely flow!

Try another Medium

If you’re feeling a little tired of the medium you’re working with, shake things up a bit! Try out another medium or even another art form entirely. Your mind is vast and there will likely be more ways than one to re-spark your creativity. I like to rotate entirely different mediums on a regular basis: ceramic sculpture on day, oil painting the next, and then a quick pencil sketch on the weekend — like this one below, that I drew recently!

Photo of mixed media drawing by Adesina Sanchez Artist Adesina sketches a young woman with sea green eyes.

Inspiring Work

Observing and taking in other works of art is actually quite inspiring. You might have heard of artistic responses. An artistic response is work done by one artists inspired by the work of another. If you feel you’re running short on inspiration, visit some of the local galleries or connect with other artists to view their work.

You can even look for original artwork for sale, (or prints if you’re on a budget), that you can put up in your own studio, and surround yourself with art to inspire and uplift you! My skull framed art prints (see below) are among my most popular pieces with my fellow artists. And if you’re local, there’s always a lot of brilliant artwork for sale in NY that you could check out and possibly use to re-inspire yourself. I recommend hitting up the galleries down in Chelsea, and once you’ve found something you like, you can wrap up your afternoon with a stroll down the Highline — a perfect close to an inspiring day!

Photo of large original skull drawing art by Adesina, Artist

Skull, Poster-size original skull art by Artist Adesina | Buy a Print

Create Art Prints

Still can’t find that spark of inspiration to create something new? Well, why not re-invent something old? Creating prints out of your favorite pieces of art is a great way to stay productive & creative, without the pressure of having to make new work. And if you plan to eventually license your work for products, a lot of the steps you must undertake to make prints, will help you with that as well.

Going Digital

First, depending on the size & shape of the piece & the size of the prints you want, you’ll have to decide if you want to scan or photograph your work.

Very large pieces, and pieces that have 3D elements, might work out better with photography. Make sure you have good (sunlight or artificial light that is daylight temperature), even lighting, and that there is no glare on your artwork if it’s shiny. When I was creating my skull framed art prints, for example (see below), the graphite was super shiny on camera, and although that was ok for displaying the original piece on my web site, I knew that it would be terrible for prints. So I had to re-take the photo, using indirect lighting that came from several angles: diffuse lighting from a set of large windows in front, and three daylight-temperature photography lights positioned around the room, which I pointed away from the drawing, and bounced off the ceiling and walls. It was quite a setup, but it was really worth it, and saved me so much time later in Photoshop.

Photo of Adesina Sanchez's Skull drawing in dim lighting

Moodily lit photo of Adesina’s original Skull drawing 🙂 — Too much shine for prints!

For photos, also make sure that you are using a good, high-resolution camera; a DSLR is great. Plus, be sure that you are using a lens that minimizes distortion. I personally have an 85mm lens that works well for just about all my medium to large works. I also recommend a tripod, so that your shots are crisp and clear.

For smaller pieces, you should scan them in with a high-resolution scanner (600 dpi or more) that is equipped to handle details. Epson and Canon make excellent scanners that last a long time and have great color fidelity. Alternatively, you can take your work to be scanned commercially, but be prepared to pay for quality. I find that in the long run, it makes more sense to invest in a good quality scanner, than to constantly have to outsource your scanning.

Photoshop is Your Friend 🙂

Whether you scan or photograph your work, you should still adjust the images afterward in Photoshop. If you don’t have Photoshop, there are a few other programs that might work, however Adobe PS really is the industry standard and makes this work infinitely easier. I believe a subscription is under $10/month at present for the program, although you should double-check before signing up.

Put your artwork in front of you, and compare it to the image on your computer. Do they match up? For photos, pay special attention to the proportions of the image: are the edges straight? Is the image stretched horizontally or vertically, or are the proportions correct? Use guidelines to help you line things up, and turn on rulers so you can measure. For scans, you may have had to assemble multiple scans into one image using Auto Blend; if so, did the merged result come out correctly, or are there tweaks that you need to make where the layers come together?

Next, look at color. Again, make sure you are looking at your original art in good, even, daylight-temperature lighting, and compare it to what you see on the screen. Do the colors match? Instead of editing the actual pixels, use Adjustment Layers like Hue/Saturation, and Curves, to alter the colors of your work. This way you don’t damage any pixels and can easily reverse any changes you don’t like. Also utilize masks and channels if there are only certain parts, or certain colors, that you want to change. Again, this is preferable over chopping up the actual pixel layers, because a mask is easily removed, and also results in a smaller file when you save the PSD.

Finally, you may need to sharpen your image before printing. Again, you must use your artist’s eye to determine if this step is necessary, but if it is, I recommend using the Smart Sharpen filter; and, if the image is not too big, I also like converting a flattened layer of the finished image into a Smart Layer first and THEN applying the filter. This last step enables you to continue to adjust or remove the filter after applying it.

Exporting Your Image

After you are satisfied with how your digital copy looks, you will have to export a flat copy to print. What format you want to use, depends on what service you will print with. If you are doing professional, limited edition giclee prints, I recommend being in direct contact with the print shop and even sending them the PSD file, to make sure they have exactly what they need. For print on demand services like Zazzle or Fine Art America, check their guidelines on their web site, to see what size and format they need.

Some popular formats for art prints are: Jpeg, Tiff, PDF, EPS.

In the past, print files were usually CMYK, but nowadays, some print services are requesting RGB images, that are normally only reserved for on-screen use. Again, check with the print service you are using, for their requirements.

If you have a good printer at home and are printing yourself, then you might want to experiment to see what gives you the best results. First, check your printer’s instructions to see any recommendations the manufacturer may have regarding art prints, and the type of paper you are using. Secondary to that, in my experience 8 bit Tiff files, at 300 dpi, CMYK, have looked best on my own personal printers.

Once you have exported a flattened version of your image, you’re all set to go! Print it out, or send it to your print service. And of course, don’t forget to update your web site with your new offering! Congrats, you now sell prints :).

Winding Down

There are many other ways for you to get re-inspired. It’s really about getting out there and figuring out what works for you best! As an artist; true inspiration is really within you, it’s just a matter of finding out what helps you connect with it.

Found this article helpful? Then share it using the sharing tools below. Or leave a comment and let me know what tips you are going to use to get your creative juices flowing, or if you have any questions. I love to help my fellow artists succeed!

Be well,

Adesina <3

Share this:

One of the things I love about making art, is its ability to freeze time, to keep us conscious of a moment that would normally pass, so that it can never be forgotten.

I painted “Buzzard” (above) in India ink when I was 16 years old. It was one of my first full scale aqueous media paintings. In this piece I see the careful attention to detail, the painstaking rendering of each feather, each shadow, and the love and joy I put into this work as if it were to be the last record of my soul on this Earth — that’s the way I always paint. Looking at this painting makes me happy, in a way that a simple photo never could.

Painting: “Buzzard” by Adesina:

Buzzard india ink painting by artist Adesina

India Ink on archival watercolor paper, painted at age 16, 11″ x 14″

Click to purchase»

Incidentally, I took the photo itself, of me with the painting, only a few weeks ago. I had elected to finally put the painting up for sale, after decades of not wanting to part with it. In a rush of nostalgia, remembering what it was like to be 16, and exploring a talent I held dearer to myself than even the life that enabled it, I decided — why not take one last photo with my painting, wearing my Sweet 16 dress?? And so I searched my boxes for it, and there it was, the black velvet floor length dress I wore at my Sweet 16. And yes, yes it still fits!

So I sat on the ground, wearing this old dress full of memories, holding one of my favorite paintings that I’ve ever done, and I took this photo that you see here. And then I brought it into Photoshop, adjusted lights and darks, dodged and burned, cropped the image for composition, and basically made another mini work of art, out of the photo of myself with the art lol. You didn’t think I would just leave the photo as it was, flat and boring just out of the camera, did you? Hehe never! I’m an artist; I must put my artist’s touch on every image I create.

I still feel apprehensive about letting this piece go. It’s part of my history & my heritage; it’s representative of my journey & my joy as an artist. But I recognize that the purpose of art, is not only to freeze time, as this painting has done for me, for so many years, but it is also about sharing one’s journey with others. And I know my love of nature, captured in this hand-painted rendering of a creature not often regarded as regal, but who is clearly so, nonetheless, is something that many people share with me. Additionally, I know that there are others who also desire the experience of gazing upon a work of art, where every line, shade and shadow is painstakingly hand-crafted.

This painting is not just a record of a buzzard against a black background. It’s a record of the love a 16 year old budding artist had, for nature and all of Her creatures. It’s a pause in the passage of time, and a journey I’d now like to share, with the world.

Thank you for spending a moment with me here, and if you are interested in having this piece in your home, please follow this link, or contact me if you would like a print; I will not be making unlimited prints of this piece, however I may make small postcard prints of it upon request.

xoxo,

Adesina

Share this:
Photo of ceramic heart sculpture by Artist Adesina Sanchez

Hey there! I’ve been busy in the studio and thought I’d share a work in progress that just came out of the kiln! And yes lol, it’s meant to be in two halves — it opens!

Here’s a video of it that I posted on Instagram:

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Adesina™, Artist (NYC) (@artbyadesina) on

Right now I’m calling it “Heartfelt Values” but that could change as it evolves. I actually started out with a very different concept – a heart yes, but for very different reasons than its current purpose. Now I’m going to add some additional pieces to give it context – I bet you can’t guess what I’m adding?

I’m also excited about the stand I’m making for it, out of a completely different material. Stay tuned for updates, and for my full artist’s statement on the piece. It’s going to fit nicely with the rest of the series when it’s done.

Love,

Adesina
xoxo

Share this:
Photo of artist Adesina Sanchez and her ceramic Wakanda mini mask

So pleased to share this mini head which I made as part of a larger series. As you can guess from this blog post title, I’ve taken some inspiration from Black Panther – the underglaze mimics Shuri’s face paint!

Check out a short video of this piece, below:

 

Making art is such a soothing and self-affirming process. Sculpting this piece in particular reminded me of my first sculptures as a child, because back then I was very much preoccupied with finish, and on this piece, I tested several underglaze combinations before I was satisfied.

There’s more to come with this piece and others, so bookmark its portfolio page for updates!

xo,
Adesina (She Opens the Way)

Share this:
photo of a drawing by Adesina, artist, of a girl and her cat

If you’re someone who has already had work commissioned for you in the past, you’re probably already aware of the process. But for those of you who haven’t, I’m going to elaborate on the process of having an original work of art commissioned for yourself. This is particularly for those who have been wanting to do so for a while and are finally ready to take the first step!
Photo of A Smiling Man and Woman At An Art Gallery

Everything You Should Know:

If you are looking to commission a work of art for the first time and are not sure where to start, here’s how you go about it.

The Artist

The first thing you want to do is choose an artist who you wish to commission. Keep in mind that every artist has their own style and capabilities. To get a good sense of the artist’s style, visit their web site and check out their previous work, like artist Adesina, or any other artist you have in mind.

However, sometimes what’s in an artist’s portfolio, isn’t all they can do. Many artists, especially those just starting out, or who don’t make art full-time, just haven’t yet had the opportunity or time to create work in all the styles that they are capable of. And your commission might just be the chance they were waiting for! So feel free to contact the artist, if you see that they have work that you like, even if it isn’t exactly what you are looking for. This is particularly a good idea, if their existing work is more complex or requires more skill than perhaps you require.

A good example of the above, is a realistic artist who has mostly highly detailed, realistic paintings in their portfolio. If they don’t have a lot of pieces, and/or it looks like they are just starting out, it’s possible that they would like to explore other, simpler/looser styles of painting, but just haven’t done so yet. Or perhaps they already have created works like that, but simply haven’t posted them up on their site yet.

Another good example, is if perhaps you are looking for a sculpture of your pet, and you find a sculptor online who has done a few really great sculptural busts of people. More than likely, if they can realistically sculpt a human being (hair included of course!), they can probably make something beautiful of your furry pet as well.

photo of a drawing by Adesina, artist, of a girl and her cat Drawing of a woman and her cat, by Artist Adesina

In cases like these, get in touch, send them an email, and just ask: Would they like to do something in the style of, or in regards to the subject matter, that you are looking for? Do they have any relevant samples that are not on their site yet, that they can share via email? In many cases, the artist will be happy for your interest and inquiry, and even if they can’t create what you need, often artists can recommend colleagues who can. Take advantage of their network and recommendations; you might find the perfect person, without having to do endless searching!

Once you find an artist whose work and style you appreciate or connect with, then you can move to the next step.

How they Work

It helps to connect with the artist you wish to commission, and find out if they do commissions to begin with. Further, different artists have different work parameters or boundaries. There may be some that appreciate a little direction, and others who would rather you left the art to them.

Figure out what you prefer, and find out if the artist and you are on the same plane.

In my studio, for example, I always ask that the client provide images of the style, indicating the level of detail, as well as the level of realism or lack thereof, that they are looking for. Clients can pick from my online gallery at Adesina.com, or they can just Google general images, and send me the ones they like.
Man And Woman Looking At A Painting

Something to Work With

You will need to give the artist you commission some information, even if they are the independent sort. Things you might want to consider include what you’re looking for by way of size, preferred shades or colors, as well as themes to work on (if that is an option).

Giving the artist a sense of what you’re looking for will help them proceed to create the work you want to see.

Monetary Particulars

Once you and the artist are on the same page about the work you’re commissioning, the artist will quote a figure. Typically, you will probably need to pay them part of the figure as an advance for materials and initial payment, to begin your commissioned piece.

Sessions and Coordination

If you’re having someone do a live portrait of you instead of from photos, you’ll need to coordinate and schedule sessions and sittings where you model for the artist. Make sure you pick an artist who isn’t too far away! Unless of course you want to make a trip of it — perhaps a vacation/portrait-painting-trip to New York City?

Final Payments and Receiving the Work

When the artist finishes working on the piece you have commissioned, you will be asked to make one last payment. This will probably be the balance remaining from the quote provided when you began the process. Once this payment is made, voila! You have your first commissioned piece of work!

Conclusion

As you can see, commissioning a piece of work is fairly easy if you have the resources. It’s finding the right artist that’s key to a great outcome. But by taking the first step and just reaching out to an artist that you like, they may be able to help guide you to refine your project idea, and to find the right artist for you, even if they can’t help you out themselves, saving you lots of time and energy!

If you want to commission and own your first personal piece of art, feel free to circle back to my webpage Adesina™ | Artist. I’m in the midst of preparing for a solo show, but I’m still accepting select small commissions (black and white drawings and small sculpted heads) thru the end of 2018, after which all commissions will be available again! You might even find something you like in my collection of affordable art prints, ceramics and sculpture. Alternatively, get in touch and let’s talk about what you’re looking for – I love to help!

– Adesina, Artist

Share this:
Color pencil drawing of a tiger by artist Adesina, with a quote by Seth Godin

We’re really big on using art to make statements on things that hold relevance in the world today. In a world where the personal is political, art stands as a brilliant way to trigger and engage in political discourse.

Photo of a mural on a gray wall, with a child and a red balloon

One of the more salient facets of art, is the personal element. Different artists go through different processes; the culmination of the artistic process being the work itself. There is no one correct way to go about producing a piece of artwork. That being said, when using your art to make a political statement, there are a few tips and pointers we’d like to share on how to go about it!

Making Your Art Political

As mentioned earlier, the intricacies of your artistic process are yours and yours alone. On the flip side, there are certain items to keep in mind, that can really help you make a political statement through your artwork.

Clarity

The first thing you want is clarity. Be very clear on the political statement you wish to make. Because you are working with visual elements rather than words, often the end meaning will be up for grabs, as your art will be subject to interpretation by the viewer. So considering that eventuality, it’s best to at least start off as clear as possible, in order to minimize misinterpretation later. Writing up a preliminary summary of what you hope to communicate, as a first step, is an excellent way to refine your own ideas on the subject, and will help you make the statement effectively!

Research

It is incredibly important to be informed before you make a political statement in public, and that goes for all activists, regardless of medium. If for example, the statement you wish to make is linked to a certain situation, research that situation and its historical context. Discover the details that can both inspire and be incorporated into your artwork, and make sure you that understand what really occurred, so as not to base your opinions on false assumptions.

Zeroing In

It always helps to be very specific when it comes to making a political statement through your art. Once you have crossed the research phase, you should have ample material to work with. If the political statement you’re trying to make is on environmental degradation for instance, find out specific situations that you can depict in your work which convey the right message.

The more specific you are, the stronger your statement is likely to be!

Downview photo of an artists desk, with a clean canvas and painting supplies.

Medium and Style of Choice

Once you’re clear on the message and the image or object you wish to make, determine what medium and style would be best for your subject matter. Is it a specific scene or person, whom you would need to render in great detail, or realistically, in order to make your point? Or are you more concerned with an abstract concept regarding your subject matter, which would be best executed in a looser style or with unconventional materials, like found objects or household items?

Make some sketches, and don’t be afraid to play with different materials to make mockups and maquettes. Being clear on the medium can help you better plan your work, as does understanding what style you wish to employ!

Putting it Up

Last but not least, when it comes to making political statements through your work, where and how you display it, can very much be a part of the message you’re trying to get across. Open public spaces for instance, where there is a high degree of human traffic, can be ideal when it comes to putting out a loud political piece!

Upshot

Art is a great way to make a political statement, and depending on how you go about it, it can be extremely effective. If you enjoy political artwork and are looking for images and sculptures that inspire both thought and social action, feel free to check out artist Adesina and her growing collection of artwork for sale in NY at Adesina.com! Sanchez’s work is layered, well informed, and politically driven, while being both aesthetically appealing and emotionally inspiring.

– The Adesina LLC Team

Share this:
Photo of Adesina Sanchez in her art studio working on a sculpture.

Hellooooo from the art studio 😀! I’ve been working hard and I wanted to share with you, a few behind the scenes clips, on a sculpture which is very nearly done – yay! 🙌💃

 

And for more videos and updates like this one, be sure to like and follow me on Facebook, at Facebook.com/ArtByAdesina

Hugs,
Adesina ❤❤❤

—-

¡Holaaaaa desde el estudio de arte 😀! Estoy trabajando mucho y quisiera compartir un video detrás de escena ¡sobre una escultura cual está casi completa! 🙌💃

Y para más videos y noticias como ésta, por favor siguenme en Facebook, en Facebook.com/ArtByAdesina

Abrazos,

Adesina ❤❤❤

Share this:
Photo of artist Adesina Sanchez in the art studio, working on a sculpture

There is nothing morally wrong with creating art for the sake of art. The creation of something visually captivating and aesthetically appealing is never a bad thing. That being said, art is an extremely powerful tool for communication.

Art has the ability to fill in where words fall short, and can make a huge impact. Art can be used to communicate concerns, ideas and opinions, on subjects that are important and relevant to society, or even just to convey one’s own personal feelings. Artwork can serve as compelling commentary on the state of the world at large.

Creating Art with Purpose

Many of us wonder how to add more depth and meaning to our work. One dimension that could potentially be expanded to enhance our artistic output, is that of purpose. There is so much more that you can communicate via your art, by fueling and directing it, with a relevant cause or message that you wish to put out. This gives you, and your work, purpose.

In this post, we will elaborate a bit on one possible route you might take during such an artistic, purpose driven process.

Connecting with Your Cause

There are many causes worth taking up and fighting for in our world today. Some of the more commonly known, include fighting against animal cruelty, racism, and sexism; as well as advocating for women’s rights, children’s rights and environmental conservation.

Think about what is important to you. Find your cause, understand what it’s about, and then allow it inform your artistic process.

Photo of spray paint, tube paints & other artist supplies

Finding your Language

You need to figure out how you wish to communicate that which you feel is relevant and important. Get a sense of what medium or mediums you want to work with. Will it be a public display or something more intimate? What kind of impact are you looking to make with your work and how will you go about achieving it?

These questions are important to ask while you are deciding both your medium and your style, and before you begin the actual work.

Getting to It

Last but not least, while actually working on your painting, sculpture or other work of art, let the cause you care about, inform your creative process. Let it influence your choice of color, stroke and composition; allow it to reveal itself in the shapes on your page or canvas, or in the folds of your clay. And while creating work that is overtly about the subject matter in a very obvious way is definitely a clear way to go about it, remember that sometimes it is not a blatant message, but simply the essence of the matter, that is enough to make the impact you’re looking for. Symbolism, abstraction, and allegory are fabulous tools in that case.

Wrapping Up

Like we said, there is no evil in creating art for the sake of creating art — so many artists have done it, and will continue to do so. However, creating art with purpose, is what the world needs more of! If you’d like to see some inspiring artwork for sale in NY, lovingly created with purpose, then check out artist Adesina’s commentaries on ecology (Bleak Future), mortality (original skull art), and equality (I Have A Dream 2013), or give us a shout on social media (@ArtByAdesina on most platforms) or our contact form, for more gorgeous, heartfelt material!

– The Adesina.com Team

Share this:
Watercolor painting by Artist Adesina Sanchez, titled Bleak Future

Art has been used to instigate, support and bring about social and political change for a very long time. Today, artists the world over, use their skills and expertise to spread awareness as well as to comment on a host of global issues.

Since some of my readers might be confused or unclear about how art has the power to bring about and encourage change, I’m going to elaborate on that a little over the course of this blog.

Photo of a mural

How Does it Work?

There are so many smaller elements that make up the whole; and if you go through each of the headings below, by the end you will see how collectively each contributes to the overarching effects that art has on society.

Space to Explore

By providing us a safe space to explore, art helps teach us to try new things, understand different perspectives and challenge norms and rules that we might have grown up with.

Inspiration

By providing inspiration, art can push people to do better, be better, and evolve, as well as face and conquer various problems they are faced with.

Expression

Being a form of expression, art encourages people to come out with what they are holding onto within. Often times this brings likeminded folk together. When together, like minded folk, with ideas on how to improve the world around them, get things done.

Free of Judgment

Art can be used to discuss and dialogue on matters which could otherwise offend people to the point of violence, in a lighter, more psychologically acceptable way. In other words, it can be used to challenge wrongful acts and injustices, without offending.

Photo of a pair of artist's hands covered in paint

Encourages Community

Whether you’re appreciating art together or creating it, a sense of community is formed. Art brings people together and encourages personal involvement. This paves the way for timid yet highly intelligent individuals, who want to take part in meaningful causes, to do so. The interaction helps breed confidence and further productive action!

Depth and Meaning

Another amazing trait of a good piece of artwork, is that those interested will endeavor to understand the deeper meaning in the work. It doesn’t matter if you’re following the life of an artist or analyzing their use of color and style of stroke. The skills you’re honing, are those of critical thinking and analysis. Both are crucial when it comes to sociopolitical involvement and action!

Universally Understood

We don’t all speak the same language, but a sculpture, a painting, or other thought/emotion provoking piece of art work can be understood by most. Even if it does not look appealing by conventional standards, the ability of a piece of art to evoke a feeling, is what communicates its meaning.

Art is a language understood by people the world over, regardless of background, educational history or age.


Though on their own these elements might not seem consequential, together they set the stage for the ways in which art can create and inspire critically thinking, socially active, as well as socially empathic, human beings. It is individuals like these, who both on their own, and collectively, push and rally for change the world over! And this, is why I as an artist, am driven to create.

If you would like to purchase affordable art prints, sculptures, paintings or ceramics, while supporting meaningful causes, then please feel free check out my site, Adesina.com, or give me a shout on social media: @ArtByAdesina on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, DeviantArt, YouTube, and various other platforms.

xoxo,

Adesina

Share this:
progress shot of Wonder Woman Mermaid by Artist Adesina

Happy MerMay!

So I started this drawing last MerMay, and even though I signed it, I never really felt I had finished it. So since May has swung around again, I thought I’d take it out and add some more color!

Here is last year’s post — Hit the right arrow to see the original progress video 🙂

And here’s an update from today! Check out the deep blues and greens of the water – What do you think? Should I add some coral to the sea floor?

I hope you guys like the picture so far, and stay tuned for a finished version!

Love,

Adesina

Share this: